Objectify: degrade to the status of a mere object.

I don’t know why mere objects aren’t shown more respect. And why is it that objectifying is considered a pejorative word?

Think of all the things that we use daily that make life easier or more pleasurable and yet we take these objects for granted.

I had cause to reflect on the importance of certain objects on our recent camping trip. My trusty hiking boots, seven years old, were at the end of their days.

On the Fairy Falls trail in Yellowstone NP, one of my boots gave up its sole. Fortunately, I was able to get back to our van with one disabled boot. But then it was high time for the boots to go into the landfill bin. I felt grateful for the many kilometers of trekking they’d provided.

Last year I read Marie Kendo’s delightful, if poorly titled, The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up.

While I’m still not a poster girl for tidying up, I did learn something valuable from reading the book: a new appreciation for objects. Kendo suggests that before we throw things away or recycle them we should thank them for the way they have served us.

I’ve been more appreciative of the objects that I’m still using as well. For instance, how would we have made it through early mornings on our camping trip without our French press coffee pot (Australians read plunger coffee pot)?


Or, how would I have made it through some noisy camping nights without my faithful earplugs?


I say, let us give a reverent nod to those humble objects that serve us. 

If nothing else, because the world is full of objects, it means that everywhere we look and every step we take, we will be walking in gratitude.