Eve in kneeling forward yoga pose torso resting on a bolster

Child’s Pose: The Pose of Innocence

For years, I wondered why this posture is called Child’s Pose. Sometimes babies and young children will end up in this posture of rest and even sleep in it. But more to the point, children appear to be at their sweetest and quietest when they’re asleep. And, perhaps never more so than in Child’s Pose.

And so too for us adults. Child’s Pose let’s us curl up, feel safe and let go–especially when supported by soft props.

How to Do It

  • Take a kneeling position, knees hip-width apart. Use extra padding under your knees, shins and feet if they feel uncomfortable.
  • Place a bolster or crossed bolsters in front of you, between your thighs.
  • Bend forward and rest your torso on the bolster(s). 
  • Let your torso be completely supported by the soft prop(s) and drop your tailbone toward your heels.
  • Turn your head to one side with your chin slightly tucked in. If this is not comfortable, rest on your forehead, chin tucked in.
  • Place your arms comfortably forward or back toward your feet, whichever is more comfortable.
  • Stay in the pose from 3 to 5 minutes, breathing gently and letting your belly relax.

A Kind Option for Sore Knees

If it doesn’t work for you to adopt a kneeling posture, try this. Place two chairs facing each other. Put a couple of cushions on one of the chairs and take a seat on the other. Bend forward and rest your torso on the cushions with your arms also supported. Turn your head to the side or rest on your forehead.

In this variation, you’ll get most of the benefits of the kneeling Child’s Pose with no knee discomfort. Plus, this Child’s Pose helps open your hips in a gentle way. In doing this modified forward bend, you’re counteracting the time you spend driving or sitting at your desk.

Eve is seated on a chair in Child's Pose, bent forward and resting her torso on cushions on a facing chair.